Letter from the President

Kathy Berra, MSN, ANP, FAHA, FPCNA, FAAN

Stanford Prevention Research Center, Stanford, CA

The 2010 Institute of Medicine’s (IOM) report on the Future of Nursing outlines numerous challenges for Nursing Professionals and for the Nursing Profession. This important report challenges each of us to practice to the full extent of our education and training; to achieve higher levels of education and training through an improved education system that promotes seamless academic progression; to become full partners, with physicians and other health care professionals, in redesigning health care in the United States; and to design and support effective workforce planning and policies to provide better data collection via improved information infrastructure.1

As your President for 2013-2014, my goal is to further align PCNA policies, programs, and priorities with those of the IOM. Over the past 21 years, PCNA has accomplished significant achievements and has established itself as the premier organization of nursing professionals dedicated to the prevention of cardiac and other vascular diseases throughout the lifespan. This has been accomplished through our collective efforts in patient and professional education, advocacy, active participation in clinical practice guideline development, programs that increase the awareness of the importance of nursing in the prevention and management of cardiovascular disease (CVD), and partnering with international associations, such as the World Heart Federation and the European Society of Cardiology. All of these efforts support our strategic goals and those of the IOM.

Our membership, 2,900 and growing, represents nurses and advanced practice nurses from hospitals, cardiac rehabilitation programs, clinics, academic institutions, home health, academic research, public health and many other health care professionals. PCNA, through our valued affiliations with over 30 other professional organizations, reaches thousands health care professionals with our educational materials and programs. We do make a difference.

Building on our past achievements, together we can continue to make a difference. Together we can design and produce new educational programs and products and be the voice for “CVD prevention and Nursing.” Together we can make a difference at our place of employment and at local, state, national and international venues by actively participating in the development of health care policies supporting lifestyle and medical therapies for CVD. Together, we can make a difference by supporting nursing research and publications.

I encourage each of you to join PCNA on our webinars, at our regional and chapter meetings, and at our preeminent annual symposium. I urge you to publish your research and clinical papers in the Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing (JCN). JCN is recognized internationally for its excellence and broad coverage of important cardiovascular topics. I invite each of you to let PCNA know if there are educational programs or products you would like to see developed - especially if you would like to be involved in this process!  Let us know about amazing speakers on relevant topics you have heard and who you think would resonate with all of us at PCNA. Let us know how we can improve our communication with you and how we can better serve your patients and your community. Join us on Twitter and Facebook…let us know about your successes and challenges. Help us make PCNA a better organization that is responsive to the ever changing world of cardiovascular disease prevention and management.

I look forward to hearing your ideas and suggestions, questions and comments. Together we can reduce death and disability from CVD for ourselves, our families, and our communities.

The IOM Repot on Nursing summarized a key finding of their research which, I believe is PCNA’s “Call to Action” for 2013-2014.

“The United States has the opportunity to trans¬≠form its health care system, and nurses can and should play a fundamental role in this transforma¬≠tion.”1    


[1] Institute of Medicine - The Future of Nursing - Leading Change, Advancing Health. October 2010. www.iom.edu/nursing