Abstracts

2014 Call for Abstracts

2014 Call for Abstracts closed November 8, 2013.

2014 Highlights:

  • Mentoring is now available (pre-submission) for abstract authors. Contact Peggy Rynearson, Meeting Planner, at prynearson@pcna.net if you are interested in being connected with a mentor.
  • Two outstanding written abstracts will be selected for oral presentations and published in the Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing.
  • Six outstanding posters will be published in the Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing.
  • All presenters and winners will be recognized during PCNA General Sessions on Friday, April 11
  • All submissions will be eligible for selection to participate in a Moderated Poster Session on Friday afternoon, April 11. Those chosen to participate in the moderated session would each be allotted 5 minutes to present their work and 5 minutes to answer questions.

INVITATION: We invite healthcare professionals involved in original data-based research or quality improvement/innovative projects related to cardiovascular risk reduction & disease management to submit an abstract. Only original abstracts will be considered (not previously published or presented prior to submitting to PCNA). Submission of an abstract constitutes a commitment by the author to present a poster if accepted. Poster Presentations will take place on Thursday, April 10 during a special reception at the Marriott Marquis Hotel. All posters will be randomly numbered and displayed together in the foyer outside of the exhibit hall.

PURPOSE: The purpose of the poster session is to present original research findings and share new and innovative ideas for successful approaches to cardiovascular risk reduction and disease management.  PCNA is proud to provide a forum for members and colleagues to share their ideas and best practices.

AWARDS & PUBLICATION: Two outstanding written abstracts (one in each category) will be selected for oral presentations. Winners will receive a $250 award and deliver a 10-minute oral presentation to participants during general sessions.

 A $250 award also will be given to the most innovative and significant poster presentation in two categories:

  1. Data-Based or Original Research
  2. Quality Improvement/Innovation in Patient Care

During the Symposium, a first, second, or third place ribbon will be placed on winning posters.  All presenters and winners will be recognized during PCNA General Sessions on Friday, April 11, and published in the Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing.  All accepted abstracts will be published on the PCNA website. 

In addition, all submissions will be eligible for selection to participate in a Moderated Poster Session on Friday afternoon, April 11. This small group session will be moderated by a PCNA board or committee member. Those chosen to participate in the moderated session would each be allotted 5 minutes to present their work and 5 minutes to answer questions.

SELECTION PROCESS: Each presenting author must submit two forms of their abstract: the first must list all authors and the second must be “blinded,” excluding author information. The PCNA Abstract Review Committee will make selections using a blind review process.  In order to be accepted for review, abstracts must adhere to the guidelines set forth in this Call for Abstracts and must be received via the PCNA online submission form no later than November 1, 2013. Authors will be notified by December 15, 2013 of acceptance.

Grading Criteria for Each Category

Data-Based or Original Research
Including research that reports data from existing data sets or original basic, clinical, or population-level research.

Quality Improvement/Innovation in Patient Care
Including, but not limited to, quality and process improvement projects, patient education/counseling programs, and creative approaches to patient and system-focused programs

  1. The investigation should be based on original concepts and provide important new data.
  2. The topic should be relevant to the theme of the meeting and/or mission of PCNA.
  3. The study design and methodology of the research project should be appropriate.
  4. The abstract should include complete data (mentioning that the results will be presented at the meeting is unsatisfactory).
  5. The findings should be factual, unique, useful, and appropriate to the PCNA audience.
  6. The conclusions should be valid.
  7. The abstract should be well written (i.e., clear and easy to understand).

The following components are required in each abstract:

  • Background summary
  • Statement of specific objectives/study aims
  • Description of design & methods, including measurements
  • Summary of the results obtained
  • Statement of the conclusions
  • Implications for practice
  1. The innovative project/program should be based on original concepts and provide new insights into efficient, effective patient care strategies.
  2. The topic should be relevant to the theme of the meeting and/or mission of PCNA.
  3. The description/design and implementation of the project/program/innovation should be clearly presented. 
  4. The abstract should include complete information or outcomes (mentioning that the results will be presented at the meeting is unsatisfactory).
  5. The outcomes should be innovative, feasible, clearly described, and appropriate to the PCNA audience.
  6. The evaluation and implications should be valid.
  7. The abstract should be well written (i.e., clear and easy to understand).

The following components are required in each abstract:

  • Background summary
  • Purpose/problem being addressed
  • Description of the design/implementation of the project/program/innovation
  • Evaluation and outcomes
  • Statement of the conclusions
  • Implications for practice

General Submission Guidelines

  • Only original abstracts will be considered (not previously published or presented prior to submitting to PCNA).
  • Submission of a poster abstract constitutes a commitment by the author to present a poster at the PCNA Annual Symposium if accepted.
  • The abstract itself may not exceed a word count of 300, including tables.  The 300 word limit does not include title or author(s) information.
  • Preferred style: Examples of winning abstracts are included on the following pages.  Abstracts must include the following section headers:
    • Data-Based or Original Research headings: Background, Objectives, Methods, Results, Conclusions
    • Quality Improvement/Innovation in Patient Care headings: Background, Purpose, Design/Implementation, Evaluation/Outcomes, Implications for Practice
  • Arial font, 10 point minimum is required.
  • Do not indent the title, and be certain that it is completely CAPITALIZED, but do not use capitals or underline for emphasis within the body of your abstract (this will be lost in the electronic transfer).
  • In the full abstract (non-blinded version), please list full name followed by degrees/credentials, employer, and city/state for each author.
  • Be sure that street address, zip code, and grant support are NOT listed in abstracts.
  • Any author may not be first author on more than two submissions.
  • Any investigator may not present more than two posters.
  • Industry representatives (i.e. from device/pharmaceutical/food companies) cannot be first author on any submitted abstracts to avoid a potential conflict of interest.
  • When using abbreviations, spell out in full the first mention, followed by the abbreviation in parentheses.
  • Do not squeeze letters or lines.
  • Left-hand border must be perfectly straight.
  • Check accuracy of spelling, grammar, and punctuation: Your poster abstract will appear in print exactly as you submit it; thus any errors, misspellings, incorrect hyphenations, or deviations from good grammatical usage will appear in the published abstract.
  • Deadline for submission is 11:59 pm on November 1, 2013. Submissions received after this date will not be accepted for review.
  • If you do not receive an e-mail confirmation within 24 hours after submitting your abstract online, it is your responsibility to contact the PCNA National Office to make sure we have received your submission.

Examples: 2013 Winning Poster Abstracts

1st Place Abstract Winner: Data-Based Research

TAI CHI ENHANCES EXERCISE SELF-EFFICACY IN OLDER STROKE SURVIVORS

Ruth E Taylor-Piliae, PhD, RN, FAHA1; Joseph T Hepworth, PhD1; Bruce M Coull, MD1; 1University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ

Background: Among stroke survivors, quality of life (QOL) is as important as functional ability. Regular exercise improves QOL, yet few community-based programs are suitable for this population. Tai Chi (TC) exercise integrates physical movements with mindfulness, and is easily adapted for persons with disabilities.

Purpose: To examine the effects of a TC intervention on QOL compared to Usual Care (UC). 

Methods: A prospective randomized clinical trial was conducted among stroke survivors (n=101), aged ≥ 50 years, and at ≥ 3 months post-stroke (TC, n=53; or UC, n=48). The TC group attended a 1-hour class 3 times per week for 12 weeks. The UC group received a weekly phone call along with written materials for participating in community-based exercise. The Medical Outcomes Study SF-36, Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression (CES-D), Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI), Multidimensional Scale of Perceived Social Support (MSPSS), and Exercise Self-Efficacy (ESE) assessed QOL. Data were analyzed using 2 (time) X 2 (group) ANOVAs.

Results: Subjects (44% women) were on average 70±10 years old, and 39±43 months post-stroke. The majority were married (53%), White (74%), college educated (80%), retired (76%), reported an ischemic stroke (63%) with hemiparesis (66%). At baseline, subjects reported on average poor perceived health (SF-36 physical=37.3±8.6; SF-36 mental=49.1±10.8), mild depressive symptoms (CES-D=15.0±10.8), poor sleep quality (PSQI=6.4±4.0), with adequate social support (MSPSS=5.7±1.2) and exercise self-efficacy (ESE-barriers=72.5±23.9; ESE-performance=65.4±25.8). Over the 12-week trial, both groups had better perceived mental health (SF-36, F1,99=10.19, p<0.01). There was a significant group by time interaction for ESE (ESE-barriers, F1,99=6.00, p=0.02; ESE-performance, F1,99=11.70, p<0.01); the UC group had significantly worse ESE (ESE-barriers, t48=-4.85, p<0.01; ESE-performance, t48=-4.33, p<0.01).

Conclusions: QOL is multifaceted with biological, psychological and social components. TC enhances ESE in stroke survivors. Long-term stroke rehabilitation efforts incorporating exercise interventions are needed to promote QOL and aid with community reintegration.

 

1st Place Abstract Winner: Innovation in Patient Care

TIME IS MUSCLE: A PUBLIC AWARENESS CAMPAIGN TO HELP PEOPLE RECOGNIZE ANGINA SIGNS AND SYMPTOMS, ENCOURAGE THEM TO CALL 911, AND LEARN HANDS-ONLY CARDIOPULMONARY RESUSCITATION

Kim Newlin, RN, MS, CNS, ANP-C, FPCNA1; Kate Carleton, RN; George Fehrenbacher, MD, FACC; Lisa Barnes, RN; Janelle Orr, Regional Marketing Specialist1; Selinda Shontz, RD2; John Poland, Paramedic; Troy Faulk, MD3; Vicki Wolf, RN4; Steve Giusti5; 1 Sutter Roseville Medical Center, Roseville, CA;  2 American Heart Association/American Stroke Association, Sacramento, CA; 3 Sierra Sacramento Valley EMS Agency, Rocklin, CA; 4 Roseville Fire Department, Roseville, CA; 5 American Medical Response, Roseville, CA

Background: Placer County ST elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) receiving centers have had an average “door to balloon” time of 60 minutes for over 18 months. However it was identified that the time from onset of chest pain to the call of 911 was too long and that only about 50% of these patients were arriving by Emergency Medical Services (EMS). At the Sierra-Sacramento Valley EMS meeting in August, 2011, the Chairman challenged the committee to improve these measures.

Purpose: Optimizing the time between onset of symptoms and the start of an intervention can make a significant difference in the outcome to STEMI patients.  It was agreed upon that we should focus on educating the public in identifying angina early and the importance of calling 911 at the onset of symptoms. 

Design/Implementation:  Starting in October, 2011 several key organizations in Placer county collaborated to create print and radio advertisements, hold a televised press conference, and identify locations to hold hands on CPR training. The team met bimonthly to strategize, obtain funding from Sutter Roseville Medical Center, create the materials, plan for distribution and recruit for Hands Only CPR training by nurses, paramedics and firefighters.

Evaluation/Outcomes: The time from onset of symptoms to intervention has decreased from 145 minutes in 2011 to 109 minutes for 3rd Quarter 2012. The percentage of STEMI patients arriving by EMS has increased from 58% to 74%. Over 1000 Placer County residents have been trained on Hands-Only CPR

SYSTEM MEASUREMENT

2011 AVERAGE

Q-1

Q-2

Q-3

Symptom Onset to First Intervention (minutes)

145

168

131

109

 

STEMI patient arrival by EMS (%)

58%

68%

65%

74%

Implications for Practice: Successful public awareness campaigns co-promoted by community organizations can make a difference in patients identifying angina early and utilizing EMS for transport to the hospital, leading to better outcomes.